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my current Ubuntu wallpaper

July 11, 2014 Leave a comment

broken_windows-wallpaper-1920x1080

Categories: fun, ubuntu, windows Tags:

machine shuts down, then restarts in a few seconds

July 11, 2014 Leave a comment

Problem
My new desktop machine has a strange behaviour. It shuts down normally, but after a few seconds it restarts automatically.

Solution
I found the solution here. In short:

Edit the file “/etc/default/grub” and modify this line:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="acpi=noirq quiet splash"

The new thing is the “acpi=noirq” part. Don’t forget to run “sudo update-grub” at the end.

It solved the problem but when I hit the SPACE button on the keyboard, the machine wakes up as if I had pressed the power button. Strange, but maybe it’s normal for new machines.

Categories: ubuntu Tags: , ,

open links in okular with Firefox

July 10, 2014 Leave a comment

Problem
You have a PDF that contains links. You click on a link but it opens in a strange browser (Konqueror?). How to open links with Firefox?

Solution

  1. Run the command “kcmshell4 filetypes“. File Associations – KDE Control Module will open.
  2. Search for html and select the file type text/html.
  3. Move the application name you want to be a default for html in the “Application Preference Order” to the top.

I copied this solution from here. Credits go to djhurio.

Categories: ubuntu Tags: , , ,

installing new fonts

Problem
You have a new font that you want to install system-wide. For instance, you copy some *.ttf fonts from a Windows machine (from C:\Windows\Fonts\) and you want to use them.

Solution
Install font-manager:

sudo apt-get install font-manager

With this software you can also browse your fonts. To install a new font, click on the Manage fonts icon in the bottom left corner next to the Save icon.

Tip from here.

Categories: ubuntu Tags: , ,

Remove Windows 8.1, then install Windows 7 and Ubuntu 14.04 in UEFI mode

Problem
I got a new desktop machine but it had Windows 8.1 preinstalled on it. What’s worse, it was a 32-bit version (on a 64-bit machine). I poked around a bit but I didn’t like it so I decided to put a good old Windows 7 on it with Ubuntu 14.04. It was afternoon…

Solution
It’s almost midnight and I got ready just a few minutes ago. Man, this UEFI thing made me suffer…

What I learned: if you install Windows 7 in UEFI mode, then install Ubuntu 14.04 in UEFI mode too! If you try to install Ubuntu in normal mode, you will have conflicts.

But what does it mean to start the installation in UEFI mode? It took me a while to figure out.

When you start the machine, you can press a button to enter the boot menu where you can select the device you want to boot from. In my case I got this info on my screen (green emphasis by me):

boot-menu

After pressing F11 (it may be a different button in your case), I got this screen:

boot-device

I had my Windows 7 on DVD and Ubuntu 14.04 on USB. Now, if you select option 1 (see the green numbers), then Windows 7 is started normally, while option 2 starts Windows 7 in UEFI mode. Similarly, option 3 starts Ubuntu normally, while option 4 starts it in UEFI mode. Once the installation is started, it cannot be changed later.

I had another problem. After several retries, I couldn’t install Windows 7. I got an error message that the selected disk is of GPT partition style. I found the fix for this problem here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQf9YqbD8WI. But be careful! This “fix” removes every partition from your hard drive. Do it only if you want to start with a clean sheet.

The fix above in short: when the screen with the “Start install” button appears, press Shift+F10 to open a terminal. Here start the command “diskpart”. Inside diskpart, run these commands:

list disk
select disk 0
clean

It will remove the GPT flag but it will also remove all the partitions!

Now, as I had a clean HDD, I installed Windows 7 first in UEFI mode (option 2 in the figure above).

After this I started the Ubuntu installation in UEFI mode too (option 4). This time I didn’t have any problem and I didn’t have to do any fancy settings with the disk partitioning. I created a swap partition and a root partition, then “start install”.

After a reboot I had a GRUB menu where I could start either Windows or Ubuntu.

GNOME Disk Utility

So far I’ve used gparted to get info about partitions. But today I found another tool that is shipped with Ubuntu called GNOME Disk Utility. It is also good for getting info but it can do some extra stuff too: create images, mount/unmount partitions, etc.

You can launch it with the “gnome-disks” command in the terminal. Or, just type “Disks” in the unity dash.

Screenshot:
disks

Categories: ubuntu Tags: , , , , ,

how to create and print a booklet

Problem
I wanted to print a booklet, i.e. “print a document two pages at a time ordered in a way that folding the whole printout would produce a booklet, half the size of the paper which could be stapled in the middle.”

How to do it? Adobe Reader can do this but I had no luck. It seemed that it created the booklet correctly but when I printed it, the pages were flipped on the long side instead of the short side, so the result landed in the dustbin.

Solution
There is a nice little software called PdfBooklet that can create a booklet PDF that you can then print. Just open the original PDF in PdfBooklet, make sure that the ordering is OK (it should be), then click on the “Go” button to create a new booklet PDF. PdfBooklet didn’t show all the pages correctly in its view pane but the produced output was OK.

Tip from here.

Categories: ubuntu Tags: , , ,

Install Adobe Reader on Ubuntu 13.10+

If you use Ubuntu 13.10+, you won’t find Adobe Reader in the Software Center. Instead, download the .deb file from http://get.adobe.com/reader/otherversions/ and install it. In my case it complained about the state of the package but I chose “install anyway”.

The easiest way is to open the downloaded .deb package with the Software Center. First I tried to install it from .tar.gz, but when I tried to launch it, it didn’t find some library.

More details here.

If you have some missing dependencies when you try to launch it, refer to this thread.

Categories: ubuntu Tags: , ,

building Aegisub on Ubuntu

March 23, 2014 Leave a comment

Problem
You want to install Aegisub from source.

Aegisub is a free, cross-platform open source tool for creating and modifying subtitles. Aegisub makes it quick and easy to time subtitles to audio, and features many powerful tools for styling them, including a built-in real-time video preview.” (source)

Aegisub is a wonderful piece of software. It makes subtitle creation almost trivial :)

Solution
Here I show you how to build Aegisub 3.1.2 on Ubuntu 13.10 (64 bit). I guess it would work with later versions too after some tweaks :)

Note that Aegisub requires wxWindows > 2.8!

Installation steps:

# install dependencies
$ sudo apt-get install build-essential libasound2-dev libass-dev libffms2-dev libfftw3-dev libgl1-mesa-dev libglu1-mesa-dev libgtk2.0-dev libhunspell-dev liblua5.1-dev
$ sudo apt-get install intltool
$ sudo apt-get install libboost-all-dev
$ sudo ldconfig    # not sure if necessary here

$ cd /opt/wxWidgets-X.Y.Z
$ ./configure --with-opengl && make && sudo make install
$ sudo ldconfig

$ cd /opt/aegisub-X.Y.Z/aegisub
$ ./configure --with-boost-libdir=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu
$ make && sudo make install

Aegisub’s “configure” gave me the following warning: “configure: error: Could not link against -lGL !“. I could solve this problem with (1) “install libboost-all-dev“, and (2) add “--with-boost-libdir=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu” to “configure“.

Links

Update (20130330)
I also wanted to install Aegisub on an older laptop of mine that runs Ubuntu 12.04. To make it work, I had to install older versions: wxWidgets-2.9.4 and aegisub-3.0.1. I tried different combinations but it was a failure. If you want to save some headache, use these versions :)

Sorry, Ubuntu has experienced an internal error

February 24, 2014 Leave a comment

ubuntu-12.04-apport-errorSorry, Ubuntu has experienced an internal error.

Does it sound familiar? Are you tired of these messages? Then let’s get rid of them:

sudo apt-get purge apport

More info here.

Update
On one of my machine the package rapport could be removed easily. However, on another machine the package manager wanted to remove a bunch of other packages too. In this case you can simply disable apport.

Edit the file /etc/default/apport and change enabled=1 to enabled=0. This setting will be taken into account on the next boot.

Categories: ubuntu Tags: , ,
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